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Everybody has probably heard about bedding a bolt action rifle to the stock for improved precision, but how many people have ever heard of bedding an AR-15 rifle?  Bed it to what? I first heard of this idea years ago on arfcom while reading user Molon’s posts on how to accurize an AR-15, and it made a lot of sense to me, so I tried it and got good results….  Then I tried it again and got good results… Now I do it for every single rifle build .   What follows is my method.

Barrel Bedding for the Precision AR-15: A How To Guide

Barrel Bedding for the Precision AR-15: A How To GuideEverybody has probably heard about bedding a bolt action rifle to the stock for improved precision, but how many people have ever heard of bedding an AR-15 rifle?  Bed it to what? I first heard of this idea years ago on arfcom while reading user Molon’s posts on how to accurize an AR-15, and it made a lot of sense to me, so I tried it and got good results…. Then I tried it again and got good results… Now I do it for every single rifle build .  What follows is my method.  It’s certainly not THE method, and many will argue it’s not necessary, and they’re probably right if you’re just assembling a blaster or “mil-spec” rifle.  However, if you want to maximize your rifle’s precision ability, please read below and think about it. Every variable matters. Barrel assembly tools: nut wrench, action block, 0.001″ stainless steel shim stock, receiver face lapping tool, 220 grit lapping compound, aeroshell grease, and brush What is Barrel Bedding? The purpose is not to precisely match the AR-15 rifle’s action to the stock like on a bolt action rifle, but to precisely fit the barrel extension to the upper receiver, making them function as one solid unit.  On an AR-15, the barrel is held on to the front of the upper receiver by a threaded barrel nut that clamps down on a flange that rests on the front face of the receiver.  What bedding does is eliminate and fill any void that exists inside the receiver between the outside of the barrel extension and the inside of the receiver.  If you’ve ever assembled an AR upper, you’re familiar with the barrel sliding right into the front of the receiver.  Was there any side-to-side wobble between the two, even after the barrel was fully inserted? If you had held the receiver in your hand and turned it upside down, would the barrel fall out?  If so, you have gaps between the two.  If you can easily remove the barrel from the receiver by hand, you have a gap.  And gap means possible wobble during the firing sequence, and that means your rifle is not performing to its potential. Now, it may be so small of a difference not to matter.  But if you want the best from your build, you need to remove the gap.  Here’s how I do it. This barrel and receiver pair is a pretty good fit, but there’s still a gap between them Square the Receiver Face First I use an inexpensive tool to lap the front face of the receiver square to the bolt raceway.  If the front face of the receiver is not square, the barrel, when clamped to the receiver, will also not be square, and the engagement between the bolt lugs and the barrel extension will not be even and balanced.   Even if the bare metal upper receiver is machined with the face perfectly square to the central axis, the anodizing process can leave the front surface rough and in need of some attention.  There’s lots of internet arguing about this step, in addition to all the others, but the thing that sold me was my own experience with a carry handle upper that was giving me problems.  I assembled the upper and found that I had to crank the windage far over to the left to get the rifle to zero.  It worked fine, but this annoyed me.  I thought perhaps the front sight was crooked and I spent a long time looking up and down the length of the gun, but the front sight seemed perfectly straight.  Someone suggested lapping the receiver face as a cure to this problem, so I bought the tool from Brownells , lapped the face, and reassembled the upper. AND…  the rear sight now zeroed two clicks off of mechanical center.  There it is.  My barrel was pointing a bit sideways because my receiver was just a bit out of square. Brownells lapping tool and Wheeler 220 grit lapping compound To lap the front face, the tool is inserted into the stripped receiver and a small bit of abrasive lapping compound is placed on the lapping face. I use Wheeler 220 grit abrasive, which is on the rough side.  400 or 600 grit will work too but take longer. Then the tool is pressed against the front of the receiver and rotated.  The directions say to chuck the tool in a drill, but I strongly suggest you simply do it by hand.  You don’t want wobble in the drill to cause problems and you don’t want to overdo it.  Lap the front face just enough to take off most of the black surface anodizing, but not all. You will have to remove the tool, carefully wipe off the abrasive, and check how much progress you have made. Be patient; it won’t take very long.  I do mine until there is only a quarter of a circle left of the shadowy dark anodizing remaining.  When finished, thoroughly clean the tool and the receiver to remove all of the grit. apply a small amount of the lapping compound on the face of the tool as shown Turn the lapping tool by hand, do not use a drill. Check your progress often. Photo shown with no abrasive ’cause it’s messy. Use the lapping tool to remove most, but not all, of the anodizing from the front face. The face is bright and shiny at 1 o’clock, but still has a bit of anodizing left by the time you go around to 11 o’clock Shim the Barrel if Necessary Next, I use 0.001” stainless steel shim stock to fill the gap between the receiver and the barrel extension.  I use enough shim to get a slight interference (friction) fit.  One container of shim stock is enough to assemble a truckload of rifles, so it should last you forever.  I cut a strip just wide enough to fit behind the index pin on top and not stick out into the feed ramps below, and long enough to almost go all the way around the extension.  I then carefully fit this around the extension and attempt to insert the barrel into the receiver.  I say carefully because the shim strip will be sharp, and it will cut you.  The container says to wear gloves when handling it. This full-length strip is usually too much and I have to begin cutting it down shorter.  My instinct is to put the gap between the ends of the shim strip on top or bottom, but you want it on the side. Gravity will naturally pull the barrel downward and you don’t want any gap on the vertical axis. I keep trimming the length of the shim strip until I can get the extension inserted about halfway in before it begins to become difficult to do by hand. Shim stock can easily be found on Amazon or elsewhere online, but mind the decimal, you want one-thousandth of an inch thickness, not one hundredth. 0.001″ stainless shim stock, cut to size a piece of 0.001″ shim stock placed around the barrel nut to remove the gap between the extension and the receiver, the seam on the side Loctite the Receiver and Barrel Joint At this point, I add a touch of blue or green Loctite thread locker to the joint to fill in any remaining void as I continue to insert the barrel.  The thread locker does not really “lock” the barrel in place like it does with screws, but it seeps into any remaining crevices that might still exist and hardens into something rather solid. Now I resort to wiggling the barrel back and forth, lightly tapping on the muzzle with a rubber mallet (RUBBER! not metal), and possibly using a heat gun to warm and slightly expand the upper receiver channel to get the barrel all the way in.  Once the barrel is fully seated, try to pull it out by hand.  If you can’t, you’ve bedded it correctly .  Well, what if you DO want to get the barrel out?  A simple 1” wooden dowel can be inserted into the rear of the receiver and be used to drive the barrel back out, and a heat gun to expand the upper receiver channel helps. When you’re about finished, add some blue or green (not red) Loctite to the joint. This is probably more than enough shown here, as I had to wait for the camera to focus. light taps on the muzzle with a RUBBER mallet will help seat the barrel A heat gun can be used to expand the receiver just a bit, allowing the barrel to go all the way in, or come out as well. Note the silver shim stock located behind the index pin A 1″ wooden dowel can be used to drive the barrel out of the receiver once it’s bedded in place The last thing to do, and don’t forget to do it, is to use a Q-tip or other fine cloth to remove all of the blue Loctite from the receiver threads.  If you have any Loctite on your threads when you install the barrel nut it WILL glue the nut in place.  That’s actually what the thread locker is designed to do, after all.  Once that’s done, install your barrel nut and finish the build! Use a Q-tip or patch to remove all, ALL the thread locker from the receiver threads BEFORE installing the barrel nut. The Results: You certainly want some evidence that it works, right?  There’s no guarantee, of course.  Play between the barrel extension and the upper receiver is just one of many things that influence a rifle’s precision.  The more variables we can eliminate, the better the results. Here is a build using a Faxon 18” non-free floated barrel that I assembled using the techniques outlined above.  When I put glass on it and shot it from the bench, here are my results.  10 shot groups at 100 yards. Faxon 18″ gunner barrel assembled using the techniques in this article. 10 shots at 100 yards using Federal Gold Medal Match 77gr ammunition and an SWFA 10x mildot scope. The barrel is NOT free floated. The results are VERY good Proof again that you don’t NEED a free-float barrel to have an accurate rifle.  Free-floating will help, but perhaps barrel assembly is more important.   But don’t take my word for it.  Here is Joe Carlos from American Gunsmithing discussing how the Army Reserve Shooting Team started using this technique on their match rifles.  This is a very informative video: Shopping list: Brownells lapping tool Lapping compound shim stock Loctite Share: Google Twitter Facebook Pinterest Reddit More Tumblr LinkedIn Pocket Email Print

Weird Gun Wednesday: The LeMat Revolver

Weird Gun Wednesday: The LeMat Revolver

They don’t make firearms designers like they used to. Those who dominate the industry today aren’t like the pioneers of centuries past—those who would take risks, dare to be bold and groundbreaking in their ideas, and obviously drink too much before taking their blueprints to the drawing board. As a result, we haven’t seen insanity tinged brilliance in the same vein as the LeMat revolver for 150 years. This Civil War weapon’s distinctiveness can be summarized quickly: It’s a freakin’ nine-shot revolver with a 16-gauge shotgun attached. Where you’ve seen it: Photo courtesy of IMFDB.org The LeMat makes an appearance in several different flicks, and understandably so, given its unusual, almost futuristic appearance. In The Quick and the Dead , a young Leonardo DiCaprio uses his cat-like reflexes to avoid the business-end of a LeMat ( right ) worn by Gutzon, the Swede. The LeMat also appears in Jonah Hex , Wild Wild West , and my favorite prematurely-cut-short space western TV series, Firefly . History: The year was 1859, and Dr. Jean LeMat had a good thing going. At first. His cousin, a major in the U.S. Army, partnered with him to market his new revolver design to the army. But just before he sealed the deal, the U.S. Civil War erupted, and his cousin became one of the first to resign and join the ranks of the Confederacy. This was followed by a stroke of good luck: The Confederates had enough interest in the design to award LeMat with a contract for 5,000 revolvers. This was followed by another stroke of bad luck: All the revolvers would need to be built overseas and smuggled through the Union naval blockade to the south. This worked to some extent: 2,900 LeMats, most built in Paris and shipped to England for proofing, managed to make it into the hands of the rebels, including famed cavalry commander J.E.B. Stuart. Close up of the LeMat’s pivoting striker. The photo shows a later pinfire model of the LeMat. The design: In the time of cap and ball blackpowder revolvers, reloading was a tedious task—one that took a long time to complete and could get you killed pretty quickly on the battlefield. Many soldiers overcame this by carrying an extra loaded cylinder and making a swap when they ran out. Again, slow going. Others still relied on the “New York Reload,” or simply carrying a second revolver. So as you might imagine, with this being the norm, having a revolver with an extra three shots of pistol ammunition, plus that whopping load of 16 gauge buckshot or “blue whistlers,” was an enormous advantage. To switch from the standard pistol cylinder to the shotgun chamber, one merely flipped up the pivoting striker on the hammer and let fly. The cartridge: The LeMat was produced in .42 and .36 caliber. The latter was not an uncommon caliber at the time, but the former was proprietary, and forced the owner of the revolver to cast their own rounds. Not much of a selling point. The 16-gauge round would make today’s popular .410 revolvers feel pretty tame by comparison. The verdict: Let’s just do some rudimentary mathematics here: 9-shot revolver+16 gauge shotgun=one of the coolest combinations in the history of firearms. If you have a couple bucks laying around and want one of your own, Cabelas sells a modern reproduction that looks like a lot of fun.

Shotgun Shell Sizes: Comparison Chart and Commonly Used Terms

Shotgun Shell Sizes: Comparison Chart and Commonly Used Terms

Ever wonder what terms like “Double Ought Buckshot” and “12 gauge” really mean? You’re in the right place, because in this article we’re going to demystify those terms, and others. The shotgun is a versatile weapon that can operate using two types of ammunition. But, the variety of that ammo might be confusing, especially if you’re new to shotguns. Never fear, because we’re going to help you understand everything you need to know about shotgun ammunition . Ready to learn? 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A shotgun shell is a “a self-contained cartridge typically loaded with multiple metallic ‘shot’, which are small, generally spherical projectiles.” Shotguns are also capable of firing a single projectile, called a ‘ slug ’. A shotgun shell is cased in plastic with a brass base containing the primer. Starting at the brass, the layers of a shotgun shell are brass, propellant, over-powder wad, shot wad, shot pellets (or slug), over-shot wad, and top crimping. The brass base of the shell is thick enough to hold the primer, which is longer than those used for rifle and pistol ammunition. Terminology Okay, we threw a bunch of unfamiliar terms at you in the above description of a shotgun shell. Don’t worry, we’ll define each of them for you so you’ll have a better understanding of shotgun shells and how all the parts work together. Bore –the interior diameter of a tube or cylinder, in this case, the inside of the shotgun barrel. Shot –the pellets inside some shotgun pellets. These range in size and number according to their usage. Wadding or Wad –this prevents the shot and powder from mixing, and provides a seal to keep gas from blowing through the shot instead of pushing it forward. Slug –a single projectile round in a shotgun shell, used for hunting larger game. Sabot –a plastic shell around some shotgun shells, which give the projectile a degree of spin as it leaves the barrel. Rifling –spiral-like casts on the inside of some shotgun barrels, these are paired with saboted slugs to increase the slug’s rotation as it leaves the barrel. Handgun barrels are also rifled. Brass –the part of the shotshell containing the primer. Gauge This is an old term that refers to the barrel diameter. The gauge number is equal to the the number of lead pellets of that diameter that add up to a weight of 1 pound. The most common gauge in use in the U.S. is the 12 gauge , but there are also 28, 20, 16, and 10 gauge. 10 and 16 gauge shotshells are rare, though they’re still being manufactured. Shotguns using 11, 15, 18, 2, and 3 gauge shells are the most rare of all the shotguns, and shotshells for these are no longer manufactured. Owners of these firearms usually have a specialist hand load the shells. The .410 round is not a gauge; instead, it is measured in caliber, though the weapon that fires it is still a shotgun. But, the .410 shotshell is still encased in a plastic shell, just like other shotshells. Shot Together, all the pellets in a shotgun shell are called the shot. These projectiles are usually made of lead, but can also be lead-coated steel, tungsten or bismuth. Shot sizes are measured with numbers starting with the smallest, which is ‘birdshot’. Eventually the numbers change to letters until you reach the largest, which is called ‘buckshot’, a popular large-game round. Main Shot Types: Pest : The lightest shot size is called ‘Dust’ and is used for pests. #12, #11, and #10 shot is also used for pests. Birds/Skeet : #9 ½ to #7 ½ are used for birds or clay targets (called skeet). Birds : #7 to #1 and B through BBB are used for birds. Waterfowl : T, TT, TTT (or F), and FF are used for waterfowl. Deer/Larger Game : Buckshot is #4 through #1 ½ and 0 to 0000. 00 is often shortened to ‘double-aught’ and 000 is sometimes called ‘triple-aught’ shot. For the shotgun hunters out there, the above chart should give you a sense of the different cartridge types used for hunting various game . Now before my inbox fills up with angry emails, let me say that these rules are not set in stone. You’re free to hunt any game with any cartridge, permitting your local and state laws. That said, the above are a good rule-of-thumb which you can reference any time you’re preparing for a hunt. Slugs Next up: slugs. Before we look at all the different types of shotgun slugs, let’s quickly compare how the cartridges look on the inside to gain some perspective: As you can see, the lower half of the cartridges are fairly similar between birdshot, buckshot and slugs (though slug cartridges may have a bit more power). The difference is in the projectile itself. Full-bore Slugs: 5 Major Types These are single projectile shotgun rounds used for hunting larger game animals. There are a lot of different types of slug. Some shotguns have a slight rifling of the barrel, while other shotguns have no rifling and are referred to as smoothbore. Saboted slugs are designed for the barrel rifling and use a shuttlecock method to keep them stable. 1. Brenneke Slugs This is a solid lead slug with ribbing on the outside. These ribs allow a small amount of rotation as the slug moves down the barrel. They also reduce friction in the barrel, increasing the slug’s velocity. This slug is solid and provides deep penetration. 2. Foster Slugs The Foster slug is intended to be fired through a non-rifled shotgun barrel. It has a deep hollow in the rear of the slug, like that in the back of an airgun pellet. They also have ribbing down the sides to give the slug a slight rotation and improving precision. These slugs are roll-crimped at the end, making them impossible to hand reload without the use of special tools. 3. Saboted Slugs These slugs are smaller than the bore or diameter of the shotgun and are wrapped in a plastic ‘sabot’. This sabot is designed to engage with the rifling in the shotgun barrel and give a ballistic spin to the projectile. Because the sabot prevents the slug from touching the bore, the projectile can be made from lead, copper, brass, or steel. They vary in shape but are usually bullet shaped. The sabot keeps the projectile in the center of the bore as it rotates, and peels away from the slug one it leaves the barrel. These offer increased accuracy. 4. Wad Slugs These are modern variations between the Foster and saboted slugs. Wad slugs are also sometimes called ‘drive key’ or ‘key’ slugs. It’s designed to fire through a smooth bore and is shaped more like a bullet with a smooth outer surface. A wad slug is loaded using a standard shotshell wad, which prevents lead fouling even when fired through a rifled barrel. Wad slugs have accuracy at a distance range of about 75 yards (70 meters), which puts them in the same category as the Foster slug. Traditional sabots can be accurate at greater distances. Wad slugs are also crimped with a fold at the end, making them easier to hand reload using a press without specialized tools. 5. Plumbata Slugs This slug has a plastic stabilizer as part of the slug. It might be either stuck into a cavity at the bottom of the projectile or over the slug in external notches. With the stabilizer in the rear of the slug, discarding sabots can be included. In the second type of Plumbata slug, the stabilizer itself acts as a sabot but remains part of the slug until impact (Impact Discarding Sabot). Shotshell Length Shotshells come in a variety of lengths. This is important to keep in mind because firing a shell longer than a shotgun’s chamber can be dangerous, even if it’s the correct gauge. Modern 12-gauge shotshells come in 2 ½-, 2 ¾-, 3-, and 3 ½-inch lengths, all holding different amounts of powder. Shotguns are marked on the barrel, for example: 12-gauge 2 ¾ inch. This shotgun’s maximum shell length is 2 ¾ inches. It’s also important to point out that you should never fire a gauge different than that of your shotgun. This can destroy a gun and lead to serious injury to both the shooter and any innocent bystanders. Always check the shell and the shotgun for compatibility. High and Low Brass A myth arises because shotgun shells have different sizes of brass. So-called ‘high brass’ shells are thought to contain more powder, making them more powerful. This may have been true at one point in the history of shotguns, but not any more. When purchasing shotgun ammo, just ignore the brass length. Conclusion If you’re new to shotgun ownership, the variety of ammunition available is probably confusing. It’s important to remember never to use shotgun shells in a different gauge as your shotgun, because this is extremely dangerous. Your choice of shotshell will depend on many factors, including what type of hunting or shooting you plan to do. Armed with your new knowledge, your next stop at the ammo store is going to be one heck of a good time! Did I forget any shotgun ammo terms? Please let me know in the comments below. Related Reads: Best Shotgun For Beginners Shotguns For Home Defense Ammo "For Home Defense" Shotgun Shell How To Reload Ammo Best 9mm Ammo Shotgun Scopes Shotgun Silencer Buy Ammo In Online Top 10 Ammo 4.6/5 (5 Reviews) Chris Browning Hey everyone I'm Chris. Founder and editor at Gun News Daily. This site was originally started by my father who passed it on to me. "Gun News Daily" has been reporting on gun news and conservative politics since 2001. We are the original gun news source. Life-long Second Amendment Supporter. 16 COMMENTS oldvet December 5, 2017 at 4:13 am I enjoyed your article tremendously. Don’t mean to pick any nits, but: 1. The ‘rifling on Brenneke & Forster-style slugs is not there to provide rotation, it is there to ensure that the slug will be stabilized in the barrel during its travel, but can safely make it out of a choked barrel. Rotational effects, if any, would be minimal at best, as these slugs rely on the weight forward (shuttlecock effect) to stabilize them in flight. 2. After pointing them out, with a pic even, you completely ignored the Buckshot loads. In some localities a required big-game hunting load. Reply Chris Coleman December 19, 2018 at 11:47 pm Actually the ribs on the sides of the Brenneke and Forster style slugs do cause them to spin after they leave the barrel and help with stability. We have shot high speed video of this to show their rotation. Reply Anthony Ricci February 5, 2018 at 8:04 pm Great piece! Reply Cass April 6, 2018 at 12:58 pm Very informative… Reply Bob Robertson April 7, 2018 at 8:01 pm So the brass base contains the firing pin? If we cannot distinguish between a firearm part and a primer, part of a shotshell, why trust any of this? Reply Sikter Efendi July 25, 2018 at 1:01 pm Starting the article with a picture of a dummy shotgun shell doesn’t help either. I stopped reading at: Sabot–a plastic shell around some shotgun shells, which give the projectile a degree of spin as it leaves the barrel. Reply GB June 4, 2018 at 12:40 pm Very clear general description of the stuff! Thank you! Reply hanne hazmonay August 30, 2018 at 9:08 pm is it true you can fire a .410 cartridge in a .45 revolver Reply Ramsey December 28, 2018 at 1:50 am All is explained very well. I am a first time shotgun owner and we spend a lot of time on bush trails. What type of shell would u suggest for a 12g for predators. I walk with two kids so something that will hurt the animal enough that it will want to bigger off as fast as it came. I usually take my 308 but can only work a bolt so fast. Reply Hans Pfadt August 16, 2019 at 6:38 pm Good article, the only thing that I would have to say on this is that the high and low brass does matter… kind of. I have a Tristar O/U and it seems that the low brass shells jam up when closing the barrel but I have no issues with the high brass shells. The high brass shells actually sit in the barrel when the extractor is all the way extended but there is a gap with the low brass shells which seems to catch the edge of the barrel when closing. Reply Jeepster October 18, 2019 at 9:49 am what would be the best load to use in a 1894 Remington side by side shot gun. Thank you Reply D. November 1, 2019 at 4:59 pm You say “A shotgun shell is cased in plastic with a brass base containing the firing pin.” ERROR = Not the firing pin (apt of the gun) but the Primer! (part of the shell). Some other things oddish but I’m not going to bother…. Reply Chris Browning November 3, 2019 at 8:14 am Updated. Thanks. Reply Todd January 31, 2020 at 2:56 am There was nothing said about these 2 terms, that I think I know now, but have not been able to confirm.: 1) Super-Magnum = 3½” length 2) Magnum = 2¾” and 3″ length, or is it just 3″ length? If just 3″ length means Magnum, does 2¾” have its own name? And P.S. Your site will not accept my Email address, which is my own company domain. I hate using Google’s Gmail or having anything at all to do with Google. Reply Chris Browning January 31, 2020 at 11:18 am Send your email to [email protected] and I will try and get your email added. Reply DN April 11, 2020 at 8:13 pm Nice piece. Thanks. I found your site while researching my Red Letter Winchester. Sure wish I could find a pic of the original pig tail lever they talk about on these. I had no idea they made Slugs for Shot guns. Would you add me to your list please? Id like to read more. Reply LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply

Best AR-15 Calibers & Conversion Kits: 5.56 No More

Best AR-15 Calibers & Conversion Kits: 5.56 No More

Trending: Best Places to Buy Ammo Online and [Buyer's Guide] 7 Best AR-15s No two ARs are the same. You can swap almost every single part for something different. The AR-15 is an exciting piece of firearms history and as time has passed its only become a better weapon. An AR can’t transform that much…yet! An AR can be made for close quarters battle with a 7.5-inch barrel, or long-range precision with a match grade 20-inch rifle. You can swap grips, triggers, stocks and more. One other thing you can do is easily convert your AR to a variety of calibers. The majority of AR-15s come in the classic 5.56 NATO round. This little fellow was what the AR-15 was designed to function with and is often the most affordable option for new AR owners. That being said you may have a different caliber AR-15, but more than likely you’ll be able to convert your AR to a wide variety of calibers. Mostly what we have to start with is a traditional Multi Cal lower receiver. Aero Precision receiver set, note the Cal Multi This is your typical AR-15 lower receiver that is typically used with a 5.56 caliber AR-15. AR lower receivers that are designed to take Glock magazines or something like that cannot be converted to a multitude of different calibers. PSA PX-9 for Glock magazines Why Would You Want to Convert? Now Travis, why would I ever want to convert my AR-15? Why swap uppers, buffers and more? Why not just buy an entirely new rifle? You can never have too many lowers! Those are all solid questions, and you are indeed welcome to do that, but there are many great reasons to use a base gun to swap calibers. The entire state of California is one, along with many other states that impose fees and ridiculous waiting periods to buy a gun. In other situations, it’s all about keeping that one perfect lower receiver. The majority of your controls are in the lower receiver. That 200 dollars adjustable trigger can be used for more than one caliber, as can that sweet B5 stock, and Magpul BAD lever, and those ambi safeties and magazine releases. A stock lower isn’t hard to walk away from, but that lower you’ve tossed some real money in it will be an excellent host for a number of conversions. Geissele trigger + PRS stock + LaRue grip + titanium anti-walk pins… In my case, I convert between three different calibers based on use. I switch my beater PSA rifle with some conversions that I don’t use all the time. I swap to .22 LR when I’m just bored or want to train new shooters or convert to .17 HMR when I hunt rabbits or coyotes. I don’t shoot these calibers often enough to have a reason to own a dedicated rifle in them. Your reasons are your own, and I’m just here to guide you through the process. We are going to talk about the most popular calibers to convert your gun too, as well as what you’ll need to convert your rifle to that particular caliber. These aren’t the only calibers or methods of conversion, but these should get you started! 9mm Without a doubt, one of the most popular conversions for a AR-15 is taking it and converting it to 9mm. 9mm is the most popular centerfire pistol round, and it’s an excellent round for the AR-15. A 9mm AR doesn’t run off the same gas system as a 5.56 and is a blowback style weapon. PSA 9mm Upper As a PCC you can use it in most indoor ranges, as well as compete in USPSA PCC division. 9mm ammo is pretty cheap and a bit more fun to shoot than a rimfire round. And it makes for a cheap day at the range! We’ll need a few things: 9mm Upper (Or barrel and the willingness to swap barrels.) 9mm BCG – These BCGs are designed for Colt SMG magazines, Glock magazines, or a hybrid. A hybrid is the easiest to find and will work fine. Heavy Buffer and Heavy Buffer Spring Magazines and Magazine Conversion Kit. Stern Defense MAG AD9 has multiple models and you can use Glock magazines, S&W M&P magazines, Beretta 92, and SIG P320 magazines in your AR 15. Best 9mm AR-15 Conversion Stern Defense 9mm Conversion Adapter 190 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 190 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing Brownells also offers a magazine well conversion block that is designed to use Colt SMG magazines. Colt magazines are incredibly durable and well made. They are a classic choice for Colt SMG builds, and the Brownells design is robust but expensive. Brownells AR-15 9mm Conversion Mag Block & 32-Round Colt Magazine 200 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 200 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing Magazine conversion kits are designed to allow your gun to feed 9mm in a multi-caliber receiver. A magazine designed for a 9mm round is a lot smaller than a 5.56 magazine so you’ll need the means to feed your gun. 9mm is so popular that multiple options exist. However, we haven’t found one that is reliable and functions across a wide enough variety of builds. Check out even more of our Favorite 9mm Uppers if you want to get into the world of PCC (Pistol Caliber Carbines). .22LR .22LR is a very cheap round to shoot and easily the most economical conversion you can do for your AR-15 rifle. You can go with a dedicated upper, but let’s go as affordable as we can. Who is trying to spend a ton of money to save some money? CCI Standard Velocity 7 at Palmetto State Armory Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 7 at "Palmetto State Armory" Compare prices (3 found) Palmetto State Armory (See Price) Lucky Gunner (See Price) Brownells (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing A .22LR conversion is the cheapest conversion you can do to a 5.56 caliber rifle. It allows you to shoot cheap ammo and is perfect for training new shooters and practicing your skills on a budget. Because the .22LR is nearly the exact same diameter as the 5.56 you don’t need to swap your barrel, upper, gas system, magazine well or anything crazy like that, all you have to do is swap out is the bolt. Well, it’s not just the bolt, but it’s a one piece drop in conversion. This one-piece system is from CMMG and has a built-in buffer system and replaces your standard BCG. The kit comes with a single magazine, and spares are readily available. As a one-piece system, the CMMG bolt is perfect for quick swaps and range trips. The CMMG bolt works surprisingly well, and I enjoy it. The magazines are affordable, but I never needed more than 2 for my shooting. Best AR-15 .22 LR Conversion Kit CMMG 22 LR Bravo Conversion Kit 220 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 220 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing The CMMG bolt is incredibly well built and is made from high-grade stainless steel. .22LR ammo is very dirty, and the stainless steel bolt wipes clean easily enough. The conversion makes the gun a blowback design so its reliable in both DI and gas piston guns. Check out more of our favorite AR-15s in .22LR . .300 Blackout .300 Blackout is the little round that could. Every year it seems we get some new wonder round that will replace the 5.56 as the standard AR caliber rifle. Every year this pretty much fails. .300 Blackout never promised to replace the 5.56, and it would just compliment it. Wilson Combat Suppressed .300 Blackout The .300 Blackout has been quite successful and why not ? It’s a great round to run an SBR or pistol on because of its excellent short barrel performance. Let’s not forget the fact it’s perfect for suppressing with subsonic rounds, and best of all it’s a straightforward conversion to make. The .300 Blackout uses the same BCG, magazines, buffer, and more. All you need is a new barrel or just a new upper. You can use the same BCG and lower without modification as well as the same magazines. PSA .300BLK Uppers Receiver 250 at Palmetto State Armory Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 250 at Palmetto State Armory Prices accurate at time of writing A quick look at uppers shows you can get an affordable one for less than 250 bucks from Radical Firearms. While you can use standard 5.56 magazines, you may want to invest in dedicated .300 Blackout magazines. Radical Firearms .300 AAC Blackout Upper Assembly 225 at OpticsPlanet Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 225 at OpticsPlanet Compare prices (2 found) OpticsPlanet (See Price) Primary Arms (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing This is a safety concern because mixing up the ammo is dangerous. Plus the .300 Blackout magazines from Magpul will provide smoother feeding. The magazine both looks and feels different than a standard 5.56 magazine. This used to be a rifle. Used to be. The .300 Blackout is an excellent conversion if you want to move towards a suppressed option. What’s your take on .300 BLK ARs? Readers' Ratings 4.84/5 (252) Your Rating? And for more…check out our Favorite .300 BLK Uppers . 7.62x39mm Rifle is fine! The 7.62 x39 is a classic Russian round that has remained popular due to its use in AK rifles. 3 Upgraded AK-47s While the AR is nearly the polar opposite in terms of rifle design and philosophy of the AK series of rifles. But if you really want to take advantage of the beefier 7.62×39 cartridge, it’s pretty easy for you to convert your American AR into an instant Vodka fan. Tested AK 7.62×39 Rounds The 7.62 Russian round is an excellent round for inside of 300 meters. Inside an AR it’s decently accurate and a real close quarters hammer. Plus, it’s cheap, really cheap ammo.  Check out our Best 7.62×39 Ammo post. It’s fun to shoot and is an excellent round for hunting in states with minimum sized caliber requirements. For a long time, it was tough to convert an AR into 7.62 Russian and it was hard to make them run reliably, but these problems are primarily smoothed out now. The uppers need good M4 feed ramps, and they need to be polished. The PSA KS-47 series of uppers are quite reliable and come in a variety of configurations, including pistol and rifle.  It’s great in that it takes AK magazines in an AR platform. But, they require a proprietary lower – so it isn’t a true conversion…but it is a great rifle! KS-47 Fit and Finish Check out our full review of the KS-47 . Radical firearms have a very affordable series of uppers too that might be worth taking a look at. Radical Firearms 7.62x39 Upper 240 at Primary Arms Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 240 at Primary Arms Compare prices (2 found) Primary Arms (See Price) Brownells (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing Additionally, you’ll need a 7.62x39mm BCG. The rim is much larger than a 5.56 round, so you are going to need to step it up. Brownells is producing a full auto BCG in 7.62 x39 and they are very high quality! 7.62x39 Brownells BCG 80 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 80 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing This conversion requires a new proprietary magazine with a crazy weird curve to it. The 30 rounders are straight goofy. The 20 rounders look a bit more normal. You want to go for quality with these magazines, and I only know two companies that produce magazines that work for the AR and this caliber. These two come from C-Products and D&H. These two companies produce some great magazines and allow you to run your gun reliably. AR-15 D&H 7.62x39 Magazine 20 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 20 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing Lastly, you may be a bit pigeonholed when it comes to triggers and this gun. 7.62 x 39’s primers are often quite hard, a signature of Russian ammo. So you may need an extra power hammer spring from Wolff to make sure they keep kicking off. Experiment first, and then see if you need a little more oomph. .224 Valkyrie The .224 Valkyrie is the newest wonder round, and we’ve talked about it quite a bit here at Pew Pew Tactical. The .224 Valkyrie has been a success, and I bet it will be a success because like the .300 Blackout it’s an easy caliber to convert your 5.56 gun into. Federal American Eagle 90 gr vs 75 gr .224 Valkyrie .224 Valkyrie is a long range round, and likely the most effective longest range round you can shove into a AR 15. It’s a short action round designed for long action performance. Best of all it uses parts that all already in circulation for the fabled (and failed) 6.8 SPC. You can quickly build a .224 upper with a standard receiver and .224 barrel, handguard, etc. Of course, you can buy a complete .224 Valkyrie upper, and this may be the best bet if you want precision. Pros have the tools, time and experience to build a tight, hard running upper receiver. Best Long-Range AR-15 Budget Upper PSA .224 Valkyrie Upper 499 at Palmetto State Armory Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 499 at Palmetto State Armory Prices accurate at time of writing Cross Machine and Tool makes a very sleek and modern upper with barrels ranging from 20 to 24 inches long. This upper comes with a BCG that’s ready to roll as well. PSA has you covered with a budget too with a 20-inch barrel and a BCG and charging handle. PSA .224 Valkyrie 20" Stainless Steel Barrel and BCG Combo 150 at Palmetto State Armory Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 150 at Palmetto State Armory Prices accurate at time of writing If you build your own, you’ll need the parts listed above and a 6.8 bolt , but you can use a standard bolt carrier group. Some 5.56 magazines will work, but 6.8 magazines are pretty affordable and accessible to find. C Products makes them from 5 rounds up to 28. LWRC makes a modern polymer magazine called the SIX8, and it can hold 30 rounds and features a transparent window. Both magazines are affordable, and they work reliably. LWRC 6.8 SPC Magazine 23 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 23 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing The .224 Valkyrie is a bit Gucci right now so expect to pay a pretty penny for the parts and the ammunition. It’s still a fun round that’s extremely accurate, but also soft shooting and fun. .17 HMR I love the .17 HMR round. It’s super accurate, powerful, and easily one of the best rounds for taking small game and even medium-sized predators. The .17 HMR round is a fun round, but it’s traditionally a bolt action rifle round. .17 HMR Vs. .22 LR You can make your AR a .17 HMR tack driver through one of the coolest conversions ever. To do so, you need an entirely new complete upper receiver as well as a different spring an add on to your buffer. You’ll, of course, need a new magazine. Good news is a company called Garrow produces it all. You can order a complete kit from them, and it comes with everything you need to run .17 HMR. Garrow 17HMR Upper What’s even cooler is that this isn’t a blowback design, it’s a gas operated, locking bolt, semi-auto blaster. It’s a delayed blowback system that incorporates the delayed blowback system into the bolt and receiver walls. It uses ball bearing to delay the bolt from opening. There are lots of reasons why this is practical and safe for a rimfire round, but to me, it’s just gun geek cool. I own one and love it. It’s a very slick tack driver with a stainless steel barrel, it’s threaded for a suppressor and two high-quality magazines are tossed into the system. You can find it at Garrow Development, and I highly recommend it. Best Hunting .17 HMR Hornady Varmint Express V-MAX 12.75 at Lucky Gunner Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 12.75 at Lucky Gunner Prices accurate at time of writing Calibers and Conversions The AR-15 is a brilliant design and a testament to that is just how far people are pushing it. The ability to swap calibers is fantastic, and as far as I know, no other weapon can convert like the AR-15. This isn’t even an exhaustive list, just a list of the most popular and common. We have 410 ARs, 458 SOCOM, 6.5, 6.8 SPC, various pistol calibers and more. If it exists in a relatively short action, you can throw it in an AR. Have you guys done any converting? If so, what? Let us know below. For more great AR-15 content, take a look at our Definitive AR-15 Guide !

A Look at 1911 Sights

/* custom css */.td_uid_2_5f379d4c57ddb_rand.td-a-rec-img { text-align: left; } .td_uid_2_5f379d4c57ddb_rand.td-a-rec-img img { margin: 0 auto 0 0; } This dusty set of sights is mounted on the author’s carry gun. Novak sights are ideal for personal defense use. The original 1911 sights were embryonic military style sights.They were more than bumps on the slide, but not much more, and they were not ideal for accurate fire. The 1911A1 featured improved sights but until the days of the National Match pistol there was little to choose from. Custom pistols miths fabricated high-visibility sights of various types and while these were an improvement in some ways, few were practical. Many were so tall and awkward they would not allow the pistol to be holstered in a conventional scabbard. Among the first practical improvements on the 1911 sights were the old King’s Hardballer sights. There sight sets featured a taller rear sight and a post front sight. Even today, these sights are by no means outdated. They are good choices for combat shooting. Adjusting a Novak sight for windage isn’t difficult, but use the correct tools. These sights are very similar to the sights fitted to the Colt Series 80 and the Springfield Mil Spec. I have always thought that Colt missed the boat when they did not add an improved set of sights to the Series 70, but they did update them on the Series 80. These early combat sights are relatively inexpensive and offer abetter sight picture than the GI sights. However, I have conducted comparison testing between these sights and GI sights and overall the advantage of the improved or mil spec sights is slight. Tests do not lie, and while I perceived the improvement as greater than the tests showed, a thorough all-around program comparing the Springfield GI pistol, a Colt1918, and the Colt Series 80 and Springfield Mil Spec showed little practical improvement when the types were fired by novice shooters. It is relatively easy to upgrade to some types of 1911 sights while others will require the services of a machinist/gunsmith.While we can upgrade, the superior course is to purchase a handgun with credible sights in the first place. The sights should be chosen for quality, practical accuracy, non-snag construction, and durability. Related GunDigest Articles How-To: Adjust Iron Sights On Fixed-Sight Pistols And Revolvers Gallery: AR Sights and Lights First Look: Colt Competition 1911 Pistol Best Starter Kit for Concealed Carry: S&W M&P 9 SHIELD $394.96 guns.com Safariland IWB Holster $43.99 brownells.com Safariland Duty Belt $88.99 brownells.com SnagMag Ammo Pouch $LOW! gundigeststore.com Disclosure: Some of these links are affiliate links. Caribou Media Group may earn a commission from qualifying purchases. Thank you! This is a tall order but one that modern sights fill well. Among the first practical high-visibility sights were the Novak Lo Mount. These sights feature a pyramid-like rear sight that offers an excellent sight picture. Kimber night sights are available as an option and should be ordered on every personal defense pistol from Kimber. The sight will not catch on clothing during the draw and offers a virtually snag-free contour. The front sight is a bold post that may be from .200″ to .249″ high, depending on the application. Reducing the vertical profile of a pistol sight is important because the sights rub on all manner of things including the holster and clothing. There are a number of considerations including short range fire, medium range fire, long range fire and snag-free presentation. Testing something as subjective as handgun sights is difficult. It is easy to note that the Novak sights are superior to Mil Spec sights, but to compare the Novak to Kimber sights is more difficult. This is where subjective opinion arises. The rear sight should have a bold profile that is easily picked up quickly. The pyramid style sights now available offer a good sight picture and do not trap shadows. When all is said and done, the Novak and Kimber style combat sights are at the top of the heap and offer excellent all-around utility. There are choices in the types as well. Plain black, white three dot and tritium night inserts are the most common types. Novak also offers a gold bead front sight. The gold bead front sight is among the very best choices. This bead gives an excellent all-around sight picture, can be seen in the dark with a minimum of ambivalent light and is immune to oil and solvent. This pistol is well equipped with a Surefire X300, 10-8 sights, Wilson Combat grips and low flash ammunition. Luminous iron sights are an excellent option, but they are not without drawbacks. For example, during daytime or bright light shooting, tritium sights often reflect sunlight. The same is true of nickel plated sights, but the tritium insert is not as reflective as nickel. Depending upon how deeply the shock mounted insert is buried in the sight, sunlight may play on the tritium sight. Tritium sights also will work loose. Usually the front sight is the one to take flight. I have only had this happen once, and it was at the 10,000 round mark, but it does happen. An example of white dot sights on a 1911 pistol. I replaced the sights of this particular pistol with Wilson Combat night sights and continued to bang out 10,000 additional rounds without any further problem. It is a relatively simple matter to replace the tritium insert; this is simply something to be aware of. I once strongly preferred black sight over white three dot sights. With the coming of age and a loss in visual acuity, I now find the white dot sights work well for me. With unaided vision, blurred sights are a real problem.

Best Chassis for the Remington 700 Buyers Guide 2020

The Remington 700 is one of the most popular bolt-action rifles launched into the unpredictable post-war market as the Model 721 and 722 and redesigned in 1962. The Remington Model 700 are a series of rifles based on the centerfire bolt action and they’re known for their accuracy and reliability around the world. As the one saying claims, ‘the rifle shoots, but the buttocks make hits”. The rifle’s buttstock is the only part of a gun that serves as a physical interface between the shooter and the rifle, playing a critical role in accuracy. Wooden rifle stocks fade out and give way to fiberglass composite stocks as a stronger, lighter, and more stable alternative to wood. In short, while wood stocks are still active in hunting bolt-actions, they are an anomaly in the modern sporting and precision rifle world. At a Glance: Our Top Picks for Remington 700 Chassis OUR TOP PICK: Bell & Carlson - Remington 700 SA Adj. Stock ​Kinetic Research Group - Rem 700 Bravo S/A Chassis Magpul - Remington Pro 700 Sa Chassis Adjustable J P Enterprises - Rem 700 Amcs Benchrest Sa Stock Chassis Accuracy International - M700 .300 Aics Stock BEST BUDGET OPTION: Magpul - Rem 700 LA Hunter Stock Adjustable Comparison of the Best Remington 700 Chassis IMAGE PRODUCT Our Top Pick Bell & Carlson - Remington 700 SA Adj. Stock Extremely light build - perfect for using on your hunting rem 700 Fully adjustable Complete stock solution View Latest PriceRead Customer Reviews ​ "Kinetic Research Group" - Rem 700 Bravo S/A Chassis Turn your rifle into a comfortable and lightweight weapon Resembles a more traditional style stock The “backbone” full-length stiff aluminium matched by a reinforced polymer forend "View Latest Price" → "Read Customer Reviews" Magpul - Remington Pro 700 Sa Chassis Adjustable Based on internal sub-chassis made of 6061-T6 billet aluminum Folding stock with a push-button activated steel hinge Feature an adjustable length of pull, butt pad, comb height and cheek riser View Latest PriceRead Customer Reviews J P Enterprises - Rem "700 Amcs Benchrest" Sa Stock Chassis Provides the ergonomics of the AR platform Feature an adjustable cheek piece AR-style forend enables mounting Picatinny rails View Latest PriceRead Customer Reviews Accuracy International - M700 . "300 Aics Stock" Full self-bedding aluminum V- block Available in solid and folding stock configurations Ambidexterity and available for short and long actions View Latest PriceRead Customer Reviews Best Budget Option Magpul - Rem 700 LA "Hunter Stock Adjustable" Dual hunting and tactical use Compatible with Remington 700 short and long actions Fully adjustable length of pull and cheek riser kit View Latest PriceRead Customer Reviews What a Chassis Offers The chassis offers consistency and enhanced accuracy, with the ability to easily install additional accessories, such as bipods, quivers, night vision, barricade stops, sling adapters, or Picatinny rails. In most cases, chassis systems sport molded pistol grips that provide better use for the shooter and the firearm. Stocks and chassis systems are the same thing, which hold the feeding mechanism, house the trigger , and allow for the attachment of a broad range of accessories. Chassis are crafted primarily from aluminum and are heavier than most rifle stocks manufactured from wood, composites, or fiberglass. Due to heavier construction, chassis are more stable than rifle stocks, and consequently, provide greater internal and external stability. Being heavier than most rifle stocks, Remington 700 chassis systems are designed from the ground-up and purpose-built to be perfect for competition shooting. However, there are a few moderately lightweight chassis, so this article will focus on the type geared toward hunters, since altering the chassis on your rifle can be a real game changer. Advantages of a Chassis System Though similar to traditional stocks, a rifle chassis system can provide a solid shooting platform. For optimal performance, they typically need to be bedded through a labor-intensive process that often requires a competent gunsmith. However, this makes the traditional fiberglass/synthetic stock more expensive in the long-run. On the other hand, rifle chassis may not even require the assistance of a gunsmith and will require few to no modifications required to install. They also add a variety of multiple types of accessories. Unlike traditional stocks typically made out of fiberglass, Kevlar or carbon fiber chassis systems are mainly constructed of aluminum and don’t require separate bottom metal bedding pillars. What to Look For in a Chassis Most chassis systems feature a common style of installation in the form of a V-block to cradle the receiver while providing two solid points of contact. The positive mechanical bedding significantly improves accuracy compared to factory stocks and negates the mess accompanied by resin or epoxy bedding. Furthermore, higher end chassis feature a free-floating barrel to ensure the best accuracy. The best full-length aluminum chassis boasts an adjustable cheek piece and butt pad, pistol grip, and comes with an integrated AICS-style box magazine compatibility. The geometry of a chassis system is designed to support the action and may demand as little work as screwing the barreled action into the chassis. The chassis system tends to work better in switch barrel applications, since it allows the barrel to be unscrewed without taking the barreled action out of the chassis. Some pose that box-style magazines are more convenient. However, for the ultimate precision rifle, a stiff and blind (with no floor-plate) receiver is essential. Today's precision shooters often prefer chassis systems, as they come with an already integrated, detachable magazine system with large capacities. Quick Take - The Best Remington 700 Chassis These are our recommendations for the best Remington 700 chassis: Bell & Carlson - Remington 700 SA Adj. Stock Kinetic Research Group - Rem 700 Bravo S/A Chassis Magpul - Remington Pro 700 SA Chassis Adjustable Review of Remington 700 Chassis The following is a list of the seven best Remington 700 chassis popular on the market. While going through the list, it’s important to find one that will stand out to you. You should also note any of the features and characteristics included with each chassis. This way, you can find one that will be the closest match to your ideal chassis. Now we’re going to move onto the review section of our article and discuss the products that made our list for the best chassis for the Remington 700. With this, we’ll be highlighting the core features of each model, then discuss a few pros and cons. Let’s take a look at the first chassis on our list: Best Overall: Bell & Carlson - Remington 700 SA Adj. Stock CHECK LATEST PRICE Pros Lightweight and high-quality Adjustable Durable and comfortable to use Aesthetically pleasing Fits well Cons Might require minor adjustments for installation What Recent Buyers Report Most new users were happy with this chassis. They said the fit was really easy and didn’t require any kind of additional fitting. It was also durable and quite handy to have for most Remington 700 rifles. One user said that upon initial installation, he even noticed a bit of recoil reduction, as well. Why it Stands Out to Us This chassis is made from composite material with an added black finish to ensure that it is tough all over and stays that way for a long period of time. The measurements are perfect for most Remington 700 rifles, thus making fitting a lot easier than most chassis. This is so tough it can even handle heavy-barreled rifles. So if your rifle tends to have a bit more weight, this could be the chassis you’ll want to install. Bell and Carlson came up with a spectacular and innovative new stock for the Remington 700. Its functionalities and effectiveness have earned it a place on our list. The stock has been made from high-grade polymer composite bonded to a machined aluminum pillar bedding block, to produce a snug fit with the action, which, in turn, improves the overall accuracy of your rifle. The composite base of the stock makes it very light in weight (5.5 lbs), which is a nice feature, since the Rem 700 is widely used for hunting and requires one to carry it for longer durations. The stock is adjustable for length and rise. The base of the stock has a Pachmayr recoil pad installed for comfortable shooting, which is also adjustable for left/right cant. The stock can be extended to one and a quarter inches for the pull. Plus, the cheek riser is also adjustable to help you with shooting from different positions. The stock has a beavertail forearm with a 2 and 3/8" wide, flat bottom and 7½" long dovetail rail to let you mount multiple accessories at once. The forend of the stock also has a swivel stud, which is adjustable from front to rear. The stock fits all Remington 700 short actions with a factory heavy barrel and hinged floor plate. Who Will Use This Most This would be an excellent chassis for those who have Remington 700 rifles that are a bit on the heavy side. At the same time, they want a chassis that won’t crack under pressure or through many episodes of heavy gunfire. If you want something that is easy to fit and is proven to be tough all over, this chassis might be exactly what you’re looking for. Bottom Line The Bell & Carlson REM 700 SA Adjustable Stock is perhaps one of the best chassis for a Remington 700, in terms of quality. While it’s lightweight, it’s tough as nails and will handle the heavy-hitting of a Remington 700. For something that is built like a tank, this is a chassis that will deliver a stellar performance like nothing else. The Stock from B&C is a lightweight and durable addition to your Rem 700. It is also adjustable and aesthetically pleasing. The qualities of the stock make it quite versatile and good for almost every use with the Rem 700. The stock might require glass bedding for competitive uses, but other than that, it is a good upgrade to your rifle. Runner-up: ​ Kinetic Research Group - Rem 700 Bravo S/A Chassis CHECK LATEST PRICE Pros Turns your rifle into a comfortable and lightweight weapon Resembles a more traditional-style stock The “backbone” full-length stiff aluminium matched by a reinforced polymer forend Compatibility with AICS-pattern magazines Forend with M-LOK mounting points Cons Some find it to be a flimsy design What "Recent Buyers Report" A lot of new users were satisfied with the chassis. They said the design itself was straightforward and simple, thus making it really easy to fit on most Remington 700 rifles. They also reported that the chassis was quite durable and allowed for more stable shooting and reduced recoil. The users were mostly targeted shooters and hunters looking for a stable chassis that also allowed for less recoil and better accuracy. Why it Stands Out to Us One of the things that stood out most was the design. Not only was it simple and straightforward, but it was also more open near the barrel area. So if you ever wonder why it was such a cinch to install this on your Remington 700 rifle, you’ll know why. This was machined with high-quality metal materials while it is also mixed together with polymer. Thus, it makes the rifle a lot more stable and absorbs a whole lot of shock, while setting the stage for an excellent overall performance for your rifle. Established in 2005, the Kinetic Research Group is a renowned manufacturer for their upgrades of bolt-action precision rifles. Some of their popular models are the Howa, Remington 700, and Sako TRG. KRG is known particularly for their high-quality chassis for Tikka T3 and Remington 700. KRG recently released a more budget-oriented, adjustable polymer chassis named ‘Bravo’. The “backbone”, as KRG refers to it, is machined from a full-length, stiff piece of aluminium, combined with a reinforced polymer forend. Which makes this system one of the lightest rifle chassis on the market, weighing in at just 2.9 lbs. Although Kinetic Research Group’s Bravo resembles a more traditional-style of stock, it has a precisely-machined internal bedding block. Bravo’s modular design involves three spacers for an adjustable length of pull, an adjustable cheek riser, and a built-in thumb shelf for same-side-thumb-grip shooters. Bravo accommodations also include compatibility with five or ten-round AICS-pattern magazines. Who Will "Use This Most" This would be ideal for a Remington 700 owner that wants installation to be quick and painless. And since it has an open design, it will be quicker than almost any chassis you may have installed in the past. On top of that, it’s a pretty durable piece of equipment that will give your rifle that all-round durability. If you want something that will make your rifle look like a brick house and be similarly hard to damage, this chassis will stand out as one of your best options. Bottom Line The Kinetic Research Group's Remington 700 Bravo Chassis is one of those must-have accessories if you want better durability, upgraded performance, and a simple to install design that will make your Remington 700 stand out like a beast. No other chassis will deliver some pretty sweet benefits quite like this one. The KRG's Bravo setup also features M-LOK mounting points on each side, as well as the bottom of the forend. Buyers also have the ability to attach various accessories, which includes everything from sling mounts to tripod mounts. Bravo is one of the most comfortable stocks available and features the essential benefits of any chassis, paired with conventional target/varmint ergonomics. Best for the Money: Magpul - Remington Pro 700 Sa Chassis Adjustable CHECK LATEST PRICE Pros Based on internal sub-chassis made of 6061-T6 billet aluminum Folding stock with a push-button activated steel hinge Feature an adjustable length-of-pull, butt pad, comb height, and cheek riser Fully ambidextrous platform Compatibility with AICS-pattern magazines and Magpul's PMAG Cons Only for short action Remington 700 actions Stock hinge increase overall weight What Recent Buyers Report Most new users were bragging incessantly about the durability of this chassis. They said this kept their barrels quite cool even after an extended period of shooting time at the range. Not to mention, they were also happy with the amount of recoil reduction this chassis provided. All told, the accuracy of each shot was consistent every time. One user said after installing this chassis, he noticed not just a reduction of recoil, but also provides a bit of an accuracy boost. Why it Stands Out to Us This chassis is designed for ambidextrous use. So right-handed and left-handed shooters alike will be happy with the ease of use. Especially left-handed shooters that have had a hard time operating a Remington 700 in the past. Also included is a thick buttpad that allows you to protect your shoulder from getting consistently abused by the heavy amounts of recoil. But even with a reduced amount of recoil, the buttpad will give you all kinds of comfortable shooting. The Remington Pro 700 SA Chassis is one of the newest Magpul products from their bolt-action line. Designed with the help of veterans and professionals, Magpul offers a new modular chassis that may intrigue those interested in tactical and PRS circles. The main feature of the Magpul Pro 700 Chassis is a folding stock with a push-button activated steel hinge and Melonite finish. The stock itself has a wide range of adjustments, including the length-of-pull, butt pad, comb height, and cheek riser. It’s adjustable in three-positions, with an additional secondary knob designed to stop any movement in the riser. The Magpul Pro 700 uses an integrated AICS-pattern for short-action mags, but also adapts to fit popular Magpul magazines such as the PMAG5 and PMAG19 7.62 AC mags. Under the forend are some M-LOK slots for accessory mounting. From the bottom side, there’s a pistol grip with an aggressive angle, popular with long-range, bolt-action rifles, and an oversized trigger guard area for those who shoot with gloves. This ambidextrous platform is somewhat heavy and weighs approximately 5.4 pounds. Who Will Use This Most If you want a chassis built to take on any kind of beating while reducing a ton of recoil in the process, this just might be your cup of coffee. On top of that, it’s the kind of chassis that will provide you with all kinds of comfortable shooting. So if you want a chassis perfect for most Remington 700 rifles used for hunting or target shooting, this could be it. Bottom Line The Magpul Remington Pro 700 Chassis is indeed one of the best in the business. It’s built to last and will certainly address the issue of recoil on so many levels. By the time you install this, you’ll notice a lot of huge changes with your rifle. Less recoil, better control, and better stability will be exactly what you’ll get out of this chassis, in general. The Magpul Pro 700 Rifle Chassis skeleton is based on a strong, internal sub-chassis, made from 6061-T6 billet aluminum and clad in polymer. Per typical fashion, the Magpul Pro 700 chassis is an uncompromising answer to MSR chassis’ created to pair with short action Remington 700 actions and other similar designs. 4. J P Enterprises - Rem 700 Amcs Benchrest SA Stock Chassis CHECK LATEST PRICE Pros Provides the ergonomics of the AR platform Feature an adjustable cheek piece AR-style forend enables mounting Picatinny rails Available in fixed or folded stock configuration Cons Fitting Required Heavier than most options What Recent Buyers Report As expected, most recent buyers were quick to call this chassis a really tough unit. They had no trouble installing this on their rifles and noticed a good amount of recoil reduction in the process. They were also impressed with the fact that the chassis is lightweight and doesn’t add any unnecessary weight to make the rifle really uncomfortable to carry. One user said he managed to install this in about ten minutes and noticed immediate changes afterward. Why it Stands Out to Us This chassis is made from high-quality aluminum. And it’s proven to be tougher than pretty much any chassis on the market. Truth be told, it just might be one of the most hardcore Remington 700 chassis on the market. That’s a really good sign if you want something built to last and can make your rifle stand out like an intimidating beast. If you want a lightweight but tough product, while providing excellent stability and upgraded performance, this chassis will definitely be a good choice for you. Who Will Use This Most This would stand out as one of the best chassis for Remington 700 users in terms of durability and usability. Not only will it make your rifle a whole lot tougher but it can definitely stand out as one of the major reasons why it performs a lot better prior to installation. For a lot of reduced recoil and better accuracy and precision shooting in the process, this chassis will certainly play a central role in that regard. Bottom Line The J.P. Enterprises Rem 700 Benchrest Stock Chassis will certainly stand out as a pretty solid chassis for any Remington 700 rifle on the market. It’s solid, does a good job reducing recoil, and will make sure your rifle performs better than ever once you’ve installed this. This chassis utilizes a H&K PSG precision-style tactical grip, with a palm shelf for easy stabilization on the weapon. Unlike a standard bolt release positioned in front of the trigger, JP applies a simpler solution by placing it on the side of the bolt-action. The ambidextrous, extended magazine release allows shooters to keep their hand on the grip changing the mag - a handy feature if you’re shooting at a moving target. 5. Accuracy International - M700 .300 AICS Stock CHECK LATEST PRICE Pros Full, self-bedding aluminum V- block Available in solid and folding stock configurations Ambidexterity and available for short and long actions Adjustable cheekpiece Compatibility with AICS-pattern magazines Cons Some don't find it worth the expense On the heavy side What Recent Buyers Report Most new buyers had nothing but great things to say about this chassis. They were satisfied with the overall durability and were also able to fit this on their rifles without any issues with the installation. One of them added that the simple design was one of the main reasons he decided on purchasing this chassis. He said it allowed him to install this with ease without any additional fitting. Why it Stands Out to Us This chassis has a green finish. While the color may not matter to most, it can work to the advantage of many hunters who want to blend in with the environment. So if you want something that will make you stand out less while looking for the perfect target (big game or varmint), this chassis will definitely be something to look at. Plus, the design makes it so much easier to install. So you don’t have to worry about any fitting or alterations to ensure it will fit on your rifle. This chassis, after all, is a drop-in, so if you want something that will be easy peasy, you’d be insane to pass up the opportunity to give this a closer look. Accuracy International Company has been around since 1978 and has become recognized globally for their tactical sniper rifles. From 1998, they entered commercial markets with the first chassis system available to civilian gun owners. The AICS (Accuracy International Chassis System) rifle chassis, accompanied by the Detachable Box Mag (DBM) system magazine soon became a benchmark in the precision rifle industry. It’s not the cheapest option out there, but it is the most advanced replacement stock system available for the Remington 700. If you plan to modify your existing Remington 700 platform as a sniper rifle, the AICS combines the full, self-bedding aluminum V-block, with the ergonomic and functional benefits of their latest advanced sniper rifle systems. Additionally, the AI chassis system is constructed from alloy and polymer to give it with a strong, durable performance, all while only weighing 5.6 pounds. The Accuracy International Rifle Chassis is available in two configurations, solid and folding stock, and is compatible with short, long, and Magnum Remington 700 models. The ambidexterity and enhanced stability are also accounted for by incorporating comfortable thumbhole stock sides and a pistol grip. Who Will Use This Most This might be the chassis that will benefit hunters most. So if you want something that will give you a finish that allows you to blend in with the wilderness, this chassis might be exactly what you’re looking for. The finish just might be one of the most overlooked features but you can use it to your advantage, if you are really smart. Bottom Line "The Accuracy International" might just be a chassis for any purpose for your Remington 700 rifle. But it stands out as a great choice for hunters that use a heavy hitter, like the Rem 700. If you want something that is simple to install and reduces a great deal of recoil for your rifle, this chassis will certainly be worth the investment. The adjustable cheek piece can be moved left or right, as well as up and down, to provide optimal cheek position. AICS comes with a flush-fit, five-round magazine as standard equipment. Ten-round mags are also available. However, some magazines need to be customized in order to properly fit. If this is the case for you, be sure to reach out to your local gunsmith for assistance. 6. Magpul - Rem 700 LA Hunter Stock Adjustable CHECK LATEST PRICE Pros Great recoil pad Made in the U.S.A. Comes in four color options Adjustable for length-of-pull and cheek weld Features the M-LOK accessory mounting system for lights, lasers, etc. Cons A separate mag well is required to work with detachable box magazines What Recent Buyers Report Most new buyers were hunters in search of a chassis to allow for reduced recoil, easy adjustments, and simple installation without any additional fitting or alterations to either the rifle or the chassis itself. Sure enough, they found it with this Magpul chassis. They were happy with the stock being easy to adjust, plus the durability of the entire chassis. One user said it’s tough enough to take on the bumps and bangs that happen while moving around in the woods. Why it Stands Out to Us This chassis is made with a mix of aluminum and polymer. They are two of the toughest materials that are proven to take on beatings and even provide superior grip for shooters. In short, installing this on your Remington 700 rifle will make it much tougher all around. And the best part, it will immediately reduce a lot of felt recoil. So if you want something that is tough and will make your rifle look like an intimidating beast, this might be what you’re looking for in a chassis. Magpul is pretty much universally-beloved in the tactical community. It's exceedingly rare that you hear an ill word spoken about any of their products, yet they tend to maintain a competitive value for money ratio, given the competition they take on. The LA Hunter Stock has the futuristic beauty and practical features to bring out the inner sniper in all of us. It is constructed of machine-finished polymer, built upon an anodized aluminum bedding block. As with everything from Magpul, it features advanced ergonomics. The length-of-pull and comb height are both fully-adjustable. Length-of-pull ranges from thirteen to fifteen inches. It is M-LOK-compatible for accessory mounting and has designated sling swivel stud screw-in points. It is designed to be a simple drop-in solution for the shooter, with no modifications necessary, just bolt your action right in. It comes in four colors, black, grey, green, and "flat dark earth". Who Will Use This Most If you hunt with a Remington 700 and want a chassis that will be an excellent upgrade over your factory default, this could be what you’ll need. Since it’s made from high-quality materials, your rifle will stand to last you years or even decades. And it can handle all kinds of heavy gunfire and recoil. For a chassis that will make recoil less noticeable and overall performance much better, this chassis will definitely make your hunting rifle a monstrous beast that no big game target would ever want to be at the end of. Bottom Line The Magpul Rem 700 LA Hunter Adjustable Stock will prove itself to be one of the toughest chassis on the market since it’s made from a combo of aluminum and polymer. Once you install this puppy, you’ll be proud to put your rifle to good use for all kinds of hunting applications. It might just put your default chassis to shame. Magpul is always a safe bet when looking for the most rugged, ergonomic, and effective after-market components and this chassis is no exception. The top feature of this model is the ergonomics and adjustability in length-of-pull and cheek rise. Besides the features and durable construction, the LA Hunter looks great no matter which color you get it in. 7. Masterpiece Arms - Rem 700 La Stock Adjustable CHECK LATEST PRICE Pros Available for both short-action and long-action versions Buttstock with an adjustable LOP (length-of-pull) An adjustable cheek riser and unique integral monopod Compatibility with AICS-pattern magazines Cons Comes without an extension for installing the rear action screw What Recent Buyers Report Most of the recent buyers say this chassis does a good job resisting the heat generated from extended periods of shooting in various applications (like target shooting). Installation was fairly simple and didn’t require any kind of additional fitting or alterations. For the most part, it was light in weight and didn’t add on any additional weight to make their Remington 700 rifles heavier. Why it Stands Out to Us The chassis is an adjustable-stock designed to make a Remington 700 much more useful for most shooters. So if the length-of-pull is a bit much, you can make the right adjustments to ensure that using a Remington 700 rifle will be less of a struggle. If you are looking for a chassis that will make easy on-the-fly adjustments and will also reduce recoil considerably, this might be the adjustable chassis to make your Remington 700 stand out much better than some of the other chassis you see on the market. Many users of the Remington 700 often seek out aftermarket actions as they find the OEM model decreases their accuracy. Masterpiece Arms has offered a rifle chassis system that provides tactical features to your rifle and assists in building a precision rifle for long-range competitions. By utilizing a V-bedding system on this chassis, MPA has increased accuracy capabilities by offering excellent precision for those who participate in long-range shooting. The V-bedding system is also a setup that transitions the action and straight section of the barrel, if desired. The MPA BA Chassis System provides a super precision platform for the Remington 700 LA, including a buttstock with an adjustable LOP (length-of-pull), ranging from 13.75 to 14.75″. However, this length can be modified further by utilizing thicker or thinner recoil pads with height and cant adjustment. With this rich design, the chassis system also features an integral night vision bridge, an adjustable cheek riser, and unique integral monopod. The monopod folds out into the frame of the buttstock and can be deployed in a quick height-locating position, supplemented with an auxiliary position of 45 degrees. Masterpiece Arms is one of the few manufacturers in the firearms industry who makes the majority of their own components and assembles nearly every model in-house. The chassis is machined from 6061 aluminum at the company’s CNC Horizontal Machining Centers and weights 5.2 lbs. (2,36 kg). Who Will Use This Most If you are in search of a chassis that has an adjustable stock and a really comfortable buttpad on top of that, this might be a chassis that will definitely stand out. And since it does a good job resisting heat, you won’t have to deal with accidentally burning your hands after a long period of use at the range. Bottom Line The Masterpiece Arms Rem 700 Adjustable Stock will make your rifle an easy to adjust firearm that will also provide a better length-of-pull for most shooters. It might also be something you’re interested in if your old chassis seems to be a little less forgiving. If you want a chassis that would be a great upgrade for your Remington 700, this just might be right up your alley. An Masterpiece Arms Chassis system is available for both short-action and long-action versions of the Remington 700 rifle, as well as for left and right-handed users. Additionally, there are different barrel contour configurations to better suit your style. Aspects to Consider Before Buying Purchasing a chassis for your Remington 700 might take some time. So before you make a decision, it’s important to mull over other aspects which will factor into making a decision in finding the best one for your rifle. Here are some things to think about: Which One Will Fit Perfectly? Keep in mind you’ll need to make sure the chassis will fit most of the operational parts needed in order for the rifle itself to work. So it would make sense to find a chassis that will be easy to work with and will allow for an easy fit for most of the inner parts like the magazine and the upper receiver. How Long Should It Last Me? It’s important to find one that will last you a long time. So be sure to look for a chassis made with high-quality materials. The better the quality, the better the chance it will last you a long time. A chassis which is not high in quality may last you for the short-term before warping or breaking apart. Why Do I Need A Chassis in the First Place? The reason a chassis would be ideal for your Remington 700 is due to the wide variety of benefits. Most people will use a chassis for the purpose of better stability, accuracy, and overall performance. It doesn’t matter what your intended application is, a Remington 700 will need to be excellent in performance. And it may take a chassis to help make that happen. Conclusion During the 1970s, the average rifle enthusiast might obtain a typical, customized Model 700 with its short, massive free-floating stainless steel barrel, glass bedded action, and walnut stock. Today, in the world of precision shooting, modern gun aficionados can choose from an array of beneficial upgrades, depending on their preferences as a shooter. Although rifle chassis systems are initially more expensive since they are considered a plug-and-play model, a chassis may be the best investment you can make. Having a modular design, rifle chassis systems have increased in popularity over recent years compared to carbon fiber stocks because they offer more versatility when taking into consideration shooting styles and customization features . We hope this review of the best chassis for the Remington 700 has been helpful in guiding you along the path to your next purchase.

Summary

Everybody has probably heard about bedding a bolt action rifle to the stock for improved precision, but how many people have ever heard of bedding an AR-15 rifle?  Bed it to what? I first heard of this idea years ago on arfcom while reading user Molon’s posts on how to accurize an AR-15, and it made a lot of sense to me, so I tried it and got good results….  Then I tried it again and got good results… Now I do it for every single rifle build .   What follows is my method.